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Desmond Tutu (top right) has been described by former President Nelson Mandela as "sometimes strident, often tender, never afraid and seldom without humour, Desmond Tutu's voice will always be the voice of the voiceless". Tutu's opposition to apartheid was vigorous and unequivocal, and he was outspoken both in South Africa and abroad. On 16 October 1984, the then Bishop Tutu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Committee cited his "role as a unifying leader figure in the campaign to resolve the problem of apartheid in South Africa". Since his retirement, Tutu has worked as a global activist on issues pertaining to democracy, freedom and human rights and has been vocal in his condemnation of corruption, the ineffectiveness of the ANC-led government to deal with poverty, and the recent outbreaks of xenophobic violence in some townships in South Africa.

Tutu has said, "I believe that education is the key to unlocking the door that will eradicate poverty and that young people have the power to make it happen."

Since 1989 Jon Snow (middle right) has been the main presenter of Channel 4 News. He served as ITN's Washington correspondent (1983-1986) and as diplomatic editor (1986-1989). In 1992 he was the main anchor for ITN's Election Night programme, broadcast on ITV. At age 18 he was a VSO volunteer teaching in northern Uganda. He has also worked for New Horizon Youth Centre, a day centre for homeless young people in central London, and subsequently became chairman. Since 2002 Jon has presented Jon Snow Reports on Oneword Radio, a weekly show and podcast. He writes regular articles for the Channel 4 News website, and writes 'Snowmail' - a daily email newsletter on the big stories coming up on the evening edition of Channel 4 News.

Lord Paul Boateng (bottom right) is a British Labour Party politician, who was the MP for Brent South from 1987 to 2005, becoming the UK's first black Cabinet Minister in May 2002, when he was appointed as Chief Secretary to the Treasury. Following his departure from the House of Commons in 2005, he served as the British High Commissioner to South Africa from March 2005 to May 2009. He is credited with building a close relationship to South Africa's ANC government, and was introduced as a member of the House of Lords on 1 July 2010. His maiden speech highlighted the needs of poor and disadvantaged children, both in rural and urban areas.

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